health

Prediabetes – An Overview!

An Overview on prediabtes

This dangerous  health condition has no symptoms actually. But it’s almost always present before you get type 2 diabetes. It means your blood sugar level is higher than normal, but not that high to be diagnosed with the disease.

 

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Symptoms

Although most people with prediabetes have no symptoms, you might notice

  • excessive thirst
  • frequent or/and excess urination
  • might have blurred vision or extreme fatigue.

 

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What’s the Treatment?

Treatment for prediabetes is simple:

 

  • Eat a healthy diet and lose weight. Losing 5% to 10% of your weight can make a huge difference.
  • Exercise. Choose something that you enjoy, like walking. Try to get at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. You can start with less time and work your way up to a half hour if you need to. Check with your doctor before you do more than that.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

 

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Risk factors

The same factors that increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes increase the risk of developing prediabetes. These factors include:

  • Weight. Being overweight is a primary risk factor for prediabetes. The more fatty tissue you have — especially inside and between the muscle and skin around your abdomen — the more resistant your cells become to insulin.
  • Waist size. A large waist size can indicate insulin resistance. The risk of insulin resistance goes up for men with waists larger than 40 inches and for women with waists larger than 35 inches.
  • Dietary patterns. Eating red meat and processed meat, and drinking sugar-sweetened beverages, is associated with a higher risk of prediabetes. A diet high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and olive oil is associated with a lower risk of prediabetes.

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  • Inactivity. The less active you are, the greater your risk of prediabetes. Physical activity helps you control your weight, uses up glucose as energy and makes your cells more sensitive to insulin.
  • Age. Although diabetes can develop at any age, the risk of prediabetes increases after age 45. This may be because people tend to exercise less, lose muscle mass and gain weight as they age.
  • Family history. Your risk of prediabetes increases if you have a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes.
  • Race. Although it’s unclear why, people of certain races — including African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders — are more likely to develop prediabetes.
  • Gestational diabetes. If you developed gestational diabetes while pregnant, you and your child are at higher risk of developing prediabetes. If you gave birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds (4.1 kilograms), you’re also at increased risk of prediabetes.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome. This common condition — characterized by irregular menstrual periods, excess hair growth and obesity — increases women’s risk of prediabetes.
  • Sleep. People with a certain sleep disorder (obstructive sleep apnea) have an increased risk of insulin resistance. People who work changing shifts or night shifts, possibly causing sleep problems, also may have an increased risk of prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.

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Other conditions associated with prediabetes include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the “good” cholesterol
  • High levels of triglycerides — a type of fat in your blood

When these conditions occur with obesity, they are associated with insulin resistance. The combination of three or more of these conditions is often called metabolic syndrome.

Complications

The most serious consequence of prediabetes is progression to type 2 diabetes. That’s because type 2 diabetes can lead to:

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Kidney disease
  • Blindness
  • Amputations

Research indicates that prediabetes is often associated with unrecognized heart attacks and can damage your kidneys, even if you haven’t progressed to type 2 diabetes.

 

Sources : WebMD

Mayoclinic.org

 

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